Temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

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Photo:  Brent Hintze

Fence Posts Installed on the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Grounds

Fence posts have been installed along the east side of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple site. Work continues on the interior and exterior of the building, which has been under construction for about two-and-a-half years. The first missionaries to the Samoan Islands arrived from Hawai'i in 1863. By 1900, when Samoa was divided into German Samoa and American Samoa, there were over 1,000 Latter-day Saints. Germany renounced its possession of Western Samoa (now Samoa) in 1919, and today there are 20 stakes, one dedicated temple, and one announced. In American Samoa, there are five stakes.
Photo:  Mitch Vuki

Steeple Housing Added to the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

White housing has been attached to the steeple frame of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple with openings on each side for Palladian windows. Decking has been secured to the roof frames, and installation of a protective underlayment is underway. The pitched roof style will help shed rain, especially during the island's wet season from October through May. Construction has been ongoing for almost two and a half years.
Photo:  Lasela N Mauga Pitoitua-Sooalo

Dual Spires at the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Site

A recent photograph of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple site shows the needle-like spire of the stake center on the right and the gold metallic spire of the temple on the left. The temple spire was installed three months ago near the two-year anniversary of the groundbreaking. The majority of the roof frame is in place, and work is progressing on the interior and exterior.
Photo:  Tino Mao

An Aerial View of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

A recent aerial view of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple site shows a slice of the village of Tafuna with the Central stake center and temple at the middle of the photograph and the deep blue waters of the Pacific Ocean in the background. Framing has begun for the pitched roof that will sit over the front center section of the building behind the portico. The temple has been under construction for just over 25 months.
Photo:  K H

Spire Installed Atop the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

The ornate spire of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple has been installed atop the steeple, and sections of the white steeple cladding have been attached. Scaffolding remains around the majority of the building as crews finalize the structural masonry walls. The temple is located in the village of Tafuna, the most populous on the island.
Photo:  K H

Steeple Frame Rises for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

Construction of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple is making exciting progress with framing for the steeple now underway. Decking has been secured to most of the lower roof, and window frames are being installed and protected with boards that will enclose the interior. Forms are going up for a concrete pour at the top of the upper walls. The walls and columns for the front portico beautifully complement the sacred structure.
Photo:  K H

Erecting Steel Support for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Steeple

Rising from within the exterior walls of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple are the steel beams and columns that are being assembled to form the structural support for the temple steeple. Concrete blocks continue to be set in place for the upper walls of the edifice while roof trusses have been secured to the top of the ancillary building. At last weekend's general conference, a third temple was announced for the Samoan Islands for the island of Savai'i.
Photo:  Samoa Realty Pago

Crane on Site at the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

As work on the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple and ancillary building moves upward, a crane has been brought on site to help crews transport heavy loads where needed. Rebar has been set for the upper structure of the concrete block temple, which will feature pitched roofs and a steeple. It is the first temple to be built in American Samoa and the second to be built in the Samoan Islands, following the Apia Samoa Temple.
Photo:  Hene Kolo Mani

Plastering the Walls of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

Crews at the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple site are focused on building the heavy structural walls for the ancillary building, located west of the temple, that will house a waiting area, distribution center, and apartments. The temple walls are being plastered to create a smooth surface over the rough concrete block. Construction on the temple complex began about 18 months ago.
Photo:  Mitch Vuki

Portico Archways Framed for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

Framing of the five archways featured in the portico of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple has been completed. Crews have been building the concrete block walls of the temple and adjacent ancillary building for about a year, and framing of the upper walls is still ahead. The temple shares the same core plan as the nearby Neiafu Tonga Temple, which is also under construction.
Photo:  Diana T. Silao-Pelini

Building the Portico for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

A side view of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple shows the progress being made on the portico at the front of the building. The majority of the structural walls are in place, but work continues on the upper walls, especially for the raised center section. The temple will feature a pitched roof to shed water from the regular rainstorms. The floor slab is being poured for the ancillary building.
Photo:  Christine Weety Lagarejos

Rainy Day at the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

Raindrops fall on the construction site of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple where the reinforced concrete block frames for the temple are growing stronger and taller. The temple president, matron, and temple missionaries will live on site in a housing facility where a distribution center will also be located. Construction on the 17,000-square-foot temple began almost 11 months ago.
Photo:  Christine Weety Lagarejos

Structural Frame for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Progresses

Billowy clouds drift over the construction site of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple where the concrete block structural frames for the temple continue to rise. Pago Pago is the capital of the island territory, which consists of the inhabited islands of Tutuila, Tau, Olosega, Ofu, and Aunuu, and the uninhabited coral atoll named Rose Atoll. Swains Island, a distant inhabited coral atoll, is also part of American Samoa.
Photo:  Christine Weety Lagarejos

Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Walls Grow Taller

Rows of concrete block continue to be added for the structural walls of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple under the beautiful blue skies and palm fronds of the South Pacific. An adjacent ancillary building will house supporting services such as a waiting area, distribution center, and apartments. Construction on the temple complex has been underway for eight months.
Photo:  FS | Samoa News

Concrete Block Walls Rising for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

A photograph captured by the staff at Samoa News shows the concrete block being set for the structural walls of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple. The adjoining stake center and gorgeous green-covered mountains are seen in the background. The temple will be first in American Samoa and the second in the Samoan Islands. The first, the Apia Samoa Temple, stands on the Samoan island of Upolu.
Photo:  Sisi Loi On Spitzenberg

Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Moves Above Ground

With a firm foundation in place, construction of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple is moving above ground. Crews are setting rebar for concrete structural walls and retaining walls. Aggregate and landscaping rock sit in neat piles in staging areas on the property. Construction of the temple began five and a half months ago on October 30.
Photo:  Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Groundbreaking Event Held for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

On Saturday, October 30, ground was broken for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple—the second temple to be constructed in the Samoan Islands. Elder K. Brett Nattress of the Pacific Area presidency presided at the event. He was joined by other Church officials and local government leaders. The event was held at the temple site located next to the stake center for the Pago Pago American Samoa Central Stake in the Ottoville neighborhood of Pago Pago. It was also broadcast to the other stake centers on the island. In his remarks, Elder Nattress said: "As we symbolically turn the soil, let us turn our hearts to our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Let us establish a firm foundation in our Savior, Jesus Christ."
Photo:  Sisi Loi On Spitzenberg

Preparing the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple Site

The site of the future Pago Pago American Samoa Temple is being cleared ahead of next month's groundbreaking ceremony that was originally announced for Saturday, October 9, but has been delayed three weeks until Saturday, October 30, 2021. Elder K. Brett Nattress of the Pacific Area presidency will preside at the event. There are five stakes operating on the island of Tutuila—the most populous island of American Samoa.
Photo:  Google

Ground to Be Broken for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

On Saturday, October 9, 2021, Church leaders and invited guests will break ground for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple. The 17,000-square-foot, single-story temple will be built on Ottoville Road next to the stake center for the Pago Pago Samoa Central Stake in Tafuna, American Samoa. The project will also include housing for the temple president, matron, and temple missionaries and a distribution center. The temple will be the first in the territory of American Samoa and the second in the Samoan Islands, joining the Apia Samoa Temple.
Photo:  Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Rendering and Location Announced for the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple

A grass field next to the Pago Pago Samoa Central Stake Center will be the location of the Pago Pago American Samoa Temple, announced by President Russell M. Nelson in the April 2019 General Conference. The single-level temple will be nearly 17,000 square feet and will share a site with housing for the temple president and matron and for temple missionaries. A distribution center will also be included in the project.